Brand Design

Brand design

Boulder Crest Retreat (BCR) came to us with the challenge of re-envisioning their image and online presence that would match their mission and vision for years to come. BCR serves as a haven for veterans, as well as their families and loved ones, struggling with PTSD and/or combat stress through their PATHH programs. Warrior PATHH is a veteran centered program that begins with seven intensive days of training at one of BCR’s facilities in Arizona or Virginia and continues virtually for 18 months. Together we collaboratively planned how we would take on the challenge agreeing on an revolutionary logo design.

Challenge: Re-envisioning their image and online presence that would match their mission and vision for years to come

My Role: Lead Brand Designer

Team Structure: Visual Designer, Lead Brand Designer (me)

 
 Updated Branding

Updated Branding

 Original Branding

Original Branding

Boulder Crest Retreat (BCR) came to us with the challenge of re-envisioning their image and online presence that would match their mission and vision for years to come. BCR serves as a haven for veterans, as well as their families and loved ones, struggling with PTSD and/or combat stress through their PATHH programs. Warrior PATHH is a veteran centered program that begins with seven intensive days of training at one of BCR’s facilities in Arizona or Virginia and continues virtually for 18 months. Together we collaboratively planned how we would take on the challenge agreeing on an revolutionary logo design.

We first went to work on the brand redesign. We conducted market research on brands that were within BCR’s field and those outside of the market for modern design inspiration like South by Southwest, Apple, and Peace Corps. By conducting market research, we were able to grasp an understanding of brands across the field and establish how BCR fits into that realm. We additionally conducted an extensive internal branding survey for BCRs employees and stakeholders. The survey allowed us to understand the internal perceptions of the BCR brand. In the end, the survey allowed us to collect a set of five adjectives that those across the organization felt connected to the current mission and future vision of BCR.

The survey and brand adjectives allowed us to develop an initial mood board to set the design direction for the new brand. We then spent time diving in the design and brand of BCR to come up with two potential directions to present to BCR. When I design brands, I always consider not just the shape of the mark, but also the type that accompanies it and the colors. All of those pieces come together to make a logo and a brand is who that logo, fonts, and colors translate across the organization.

We presented the two directions to the BCR team and received really helpful feedback. The team was excited about the directions and the more modern look, but it was obvious that they felt disconnected from the options because it didn’t include their outdoorsy colors. We didn’t scrap the progress we made because there were features about the first round that the team gravitated too. It was very important to us to simply listening in the first direction meeting and ask many questions, to truly understand the “why” behind their actions.

So, we went back to the mood board and we adjusted for the next presentation. This time we provided both a revolutionary (drastic change that is not connected to the original visuals) and evolutionary (modern adjustments, but the core of brand still visually connected) option. This time it was clear that everyone on the BCR team was on the same page. They choose the evolutionary direction because they felt is solved the challenge of re-envisioning their organization for years to come but felt authentic to BCR. After discussion, the BCR team also realized that they wanted to push the bar on mark. With an evolutionary logo, they wanted their mark to be revolutionary.

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